The-warehouse-hotel-evening-river-facade

A Singaporean Heritage: From „Godown“ to Boutique Hotel

17.05.2017

Back in Lim Ho Puah’s time, the banks along Singapore River quivered with sinister activities of underground Chinese and Fujianese secret syndicates. Gambling and prostitution prevailed and the flourishing opium trade reliably accounted for half of the revenue thriving businesses along the Strait of Malacca route generated. Since most smokers were hopelessly addicted and the trade was supported by the colonial government, profits stayed at a long-time high. In the very midst of this illustrious district right by the river lay Lim Ho Puah’s „godown“, the warehouse he had built in 1895.

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Reading time: about 2 minutes
Artificial Intelligence

TED Talk. Sam Harris: How can we build AI without losing control?

26.04.2017

The scenario Sam describes in his talk is disconcerting, even terrifying, but likely to occur: AI – artificial intelligence – could ultimately destroy us or inspire us to destroy ourselves. „One of the things that worry me most about the development of AI at this point is that we seem unable to marshal an appropriate emotional response to the dangers that lie ahead.“ Sam’s concern is that one day machines built by us might treat us with the same disregard as ants are treated by us. „It seems overwhelmingly likely, however, that the spectrum of intelligence extends much further than we currently conceive, and if we build machines that are more intelligent than we are, they will very likely explore this spectrum in ways that we can’t imagine, and exceed us in ways that we can’t imagine.“

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Reading time: about 1 minute
Heiligendamm. An incentive event in front of Hohenzollern Castle

Heiligendamm: A White Beauty by the Sea

28.03.2017

As is frequently the case, the spirit of a new era is ushered in by initiative of one committed individual. When it comes to the history of German spa-ing, it is said to have been a progressive physician by the name of Samuel Gottlieb Vogel, who had triggered off the lasting success story of sea-side health treatments. The healing effects of a coastal climate and the invigorating properties of salty seawater on skins in desperate need of airing, were promoted by him. And, in order to corroborate his cause, Vogel convinced nobility to act as prominent supporters and forerunners, making Heiligendamm with its tideless shores the premier German spa resort and Friedrich Franz I of Mecklenburg-Schwerin the first-ever guest to use it. That was back in 1793.

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Reading time: about 3 minutes
A Galloway by Pexels

Common Sense vs. Decadence

20.02.2017

 

The 25 most expensive Dishes and Drinks compiled by Ignitespot

As is widely known, there are many sappy fruitcakes on the face of this earth, some even make it to the top of politics. But no, what we are talking about here is genuine food, albeit of a nature that again gives reason to doubt reason. Spending a fortune on a humble trench of Japanese Miyazaki Wagyu beef – the Kobe superlative – may still be somewhat comprehensible given the fact that body and soul of an Asian cow need to be pampered into beef so artfully marbled and tender that effort and price are warranted and the cow is a happy one until death do them part, bovine and farmer. If you are a good Miyazaki-Wagyu-beef producer you might even win the Japanese Culinary Olympics Beef Competition held in Nagasaki every five years. And so it happens that a slice of Lancashire Wagyu & Mushroom Pie served in England may cost you a handsome 1,781 US-$.

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All sorts of beer in Iceland

Iceland for Beer Enthusiasts?

11.01.2017

A Guest Post by Atlantik DMC, Iceland

Beer has been in the story books of Iceland since settlement times in 874. Yet, in 1915, alcohol was banned in Iceland. In 1921, the import of rosé and red wine from Spain and Portugal was approved due to business trading – and other products followed later. Eventually in 1935, all alcohol except beer became legalised. During the prohibition years, the two breweries in Iceland were allowed to only brew a 2,25% beer which we normally call Pilsner.

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Reading time: about 4 minutes