Topic: Berlin

Twinkind: A man looking at his 3D-printed mini look-alike.

3D-Technology: Print yourself another you

26.01.2015

There’s screeching violins and scary guns, minute bikinis and most interesting food. Human stem cells, bionic ears, fetuses or King Richard III.’s reconstructed face. With appliances becoming more affordable, 3D printing has not only enriched the options for the science and technology sectors considerably. A wide array of objects can now be designed and printed up to a certain scale with the range stretching from things practical to weird and from commercial products to manufacturing parts. Bioprinting of portions of the human body for medical purposes has revolutionised the field. And a wealth of exciting developments is still in the pipeline. Experts predict that privately owned 3D printers will be a frequent commodity in the not too distant future and 3-dimensional DIY activities a realistic option for virtually everyone.

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Reading time: about 3 minutes
A crown instead of a wreath: The topping out ceremony of the City Cube in Berlin.

Berlin’s new Conference Baby: It’s a Cube!…

16.05.2014


… and, not only by Berlin standards, a smooth childbirth (considering the shape) after a model pregnancy: A time span of a mere 22 months separated groundbreaking from completion of the CityCube – the capital’s brand new trade fair and congress venue. Its organism was jogged to life upon its inauguration on May 5th, 2014, after the very last missing module had been implanted into the building’s core. The symbolic heart was solemnly inserted by Berlin’s Governing Mayor, Klaus Wowereit in concert with Messe Berlin’s CEO, Dr. Christian Göke. „A cube is born“, the motto chosen for the opening ceremony, could not have been more befitting. The stylish venue is laid out to host events for up to 11,000 participants.

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Reading time: about 3 minutes
Tempelhof Airport in Berlin is steeped in history and drama.

Berlin: Tempelhof Airport – a legend!

15.01.2014

Tempelhof Airport was closed for public air traffic in October 2008. 85 years earlier, in October 1923, ‘the first commercial airport worldwide’ was inaugurated by the German Reich’s Ministry of Transport; the initial route operated to Koenigsberg (now Kaliningrad) in former East Prussia. The first plane of the newly founded “Deutsche Luft Hansa” had its maiden voyage from Berlin to Zurich in 1926 and even gigantic Zeppelins majestically raised from the vast Tempelhof airfield. By the 1930s, it had developed into Europe’s busiest airport – ranging ahead of Paris, Amsterdam and London. But Tempelhof is unforgotten for the dramatic role it was to play in post-war Germany.

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Reading time: about 2 minutes
A tailor cutting a pattern. Fashion and Couture: There are many creative minds active in Berlin.

Berlin: A City on the Catwalk

15.01.2014

From 1961 to 1989 Berlin, divided into East and West since 1945, was scarred with an invincible concrete wall topped with multiple rolls of impenetrable barbed wire. Armed Vopos, the East German ‘people’s’ policemen equipped with a licence to kill, controlled from their watchtowers the so-called ‘death strip’ passing between the two Germanies; none of the GDR’s involuntary citizens were to escape the socialist paradise imposed on them. Inhabitants of West Berlin belonging to the Federal Republic were better off – and seemingly unimpressed by their severed freedom. Although fenced in, neither their positive attitude, nor their special sense of humour could be suffocated – nor their creativity be paralysed by the circumstances.

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Reading time: about 3 minutes
LGBTI: Colourful and diverse Helsinki.

LGBTI – der unterschätzte Markt

1.10.2013

Diversity Tourism: Reisen im Zeichen des Regenbogens

Vom anderen Ufer rollt – nur scheinbar urplötzlich – eine kraftvolle menschliche Welle heran. Weil lange ignoriert und immer noch stigmatisiert, wird ihr wahres Potenzial dramatisch verkannt: Bis zu zehn Prozent der Weltbevölkerung sollen homosexuell sein oder LGBTI angehören. In Realität sind die Zahlen aus nachvollziehbaren Gründen unmessbar und auch ehrgeizige stochastische Akrobatik kann nur an ihnen scheitern. Es bleibt ein Segen, dass zivilisierte Länder auf ihren offiziellen Formularen auf die Rubrik “Sexuelle Veranlagung” verzichten. Gemäß Statistik von ILGA wird Homosexualität weltweit noch in etwa 80 Staaten und Territorien strafrechtlich verfolgt. Die Palette variiert von einem Monat Gefängnis bis zur Todesstrafe.

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Reading time: about 14 minutes